MUST READS: Global warming

In Must Reads, Notes by Mark Hillman

The real costs of ‘cap and trade’ – Don Nickles and Charles Stenholm, Investors Business Daily
If you think energy prices are high now, wait until Congress slaps a ‘cap and trade’ carbon tax on top of existing costs — and without any assurance that other all of this ‘sacrifice’ will make a difference.

UN’s climate assumptions are flawed – National Center for Policy Analysis
Several assessments have shown that the techniques and methods used to derive and verify the IPCC’s climate predictions are fundamentally flawed. IPCC’s central claims — that the present warming trend is unusual, caused by human activities and will result in serious harm — are not supported by scientific forecasts. Rather, these claims are opinions.

Four questions about climate change must be answered – John Lott, Fox News
Global temperatures have now largely eliminated most of the one degree Celsius warming that had previously occurred over the last 100 years. Hundreds of climate scientists have warned that there is not significant man-made global warming.

Polar bears not really on thin ice — National Center for Policy Analysis
Comprehensive research demonstrates that since the 1970s — while much of the world was warming — polar bear numbers increased dramatically to approximately 25,000 today (higher than at any time in the 20th century). Research conducted by the World Wildlife Fund shows that of the 20 distinct polar bear populations worldwide only two are decreasing — those populations are in areas where air temperatures have actually fallen.

Will global warming save lives? — Investors Business Daily
A study done for the British government says that global warming will kill thousands. It also says lives will be saved due to warmer winters. OK, which is it?

Judge rules Gore film has 9 errors — Washington Post
A British High Court Judge said Al Gore’s "An Inconvenient Truth" makes nine statements that are not supported by current mainstream scientific consensus. Teachers, he concluded, must alert students to what the judge called errors.